Zoom Class – Deirdre Murray Monday 22 Feb

10.00

Introduction to Irish Genealogy with Deirdre Murray

Monday 22 February 2021, 7.30pm to 9.30pm

There has never been a better time to start your own family research.   With so many resources available now, Ireland has become a world leader in family research.  This is not surprising considering the hundreds of millions of Irish diaspora who are eager to unearth the historical detail of their family’s past.

Having an interest in genealogy is often referred to as having been ‘bitten by the bug’.  However Deirdre views it not just as a bug, but as an incurable infection.  With now over 4,000 people in her growing family tree the journey continues to be a labour of love recording the trials and tribulations of her ancestors lives in rural Ireland over the past 300 years.

During this short introduction to Irish Genealogy, Deirdre hopes to cover the following topics

–        How to start & record your family research

–        Common pitfalls and how to avoid them

–        Hints & tips on researching the family name

–        Identify some of the on-line resources

–        Examples of Primary Records

–        Secondary sources of information

–        Research documents from the 1800’s

–        Roman Catholic & Church of Ireland Parish Records

–        Tithe Applotment Books 1823 – 1837

–        Census Records 1841, 1851, 1901, 1911

–        Griffiths Valuation Records 1848 – 1864

–        Civil Registration Records 1865

–        Old Age Pension Act 1908

Presenter Deirdre Murray 

Deirdre Murray has been researching her family history for over 15 years.  Her interest started as a child, with her grandmother recalling stories about her ancestors.  Deirdre found that research in the early days was very difficult.  This was mainly due to the unavailability or restricted access to any kind of records.  When they were available a single civil record cost €18 so research ended up being a costly exercise. It is very different today with an increase in on-line resources full of valuable and interesting documents, and more records becoming available, digitised and accessible on-line in a cost effective manner.

IRI Fundraiser Event

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Introduction to Irish Genealogy with Deirdre Murray

Monday 22 February 2021, 7.30pm to 9.30pm

There has never been a better time to start your own family research.   With so many resources available now, Ireland has become a world leader in family research.  This is not surprising considering the hundreds of millions of Irish diaspora who are eager to unearth the historical detail of their family’s past.

Having an interest in genealogy is often referred to as having been ‘bitten by the bug’.  However Deirdre views it not just as a bug, but as an incurable infection.  With now over 4,000 people in her growing family tree the journey continues to be a labour of love recording the trials and tribulations of her ancestors lives in rural Ireland over the past 300 years.

During this short introduction to Irish Genealogy, Deirdre hopes to cover the following topics

–        How to start & record your family research

–        Common pitfalls and how to avoid them

–        Hints & tips on researching the family name

–        Identify some of the on-line resources

–        Examples of Primary Records

–        Secondary sources of information

–        Research documents from the 1800’s

–        Roman Catholic & Church of Ireland Parish Records

–        Tithe Applotment Books 1823 – 1837

–        Census Records 1841, 1851, 1901, 1911

–        Griffiths Valuation Records 1848 – 1864

–        Civil Registration Records 1865

–        Old Age Pension Act 1908

Presenter Deirdre Murray 

Deirdre Murray has been researching her family history for over 15 years.  Her interest started as a child, with her grandmother recalling stories about her ancestors.  Deirdre found that research in the early days was very difficult.  This was mainly due to the unavailability or restricted access to any kind of records.  When they were available a single civil record cost €18 so research ended up being a costly exercise. It is very different today with an increase in on-line resources full of valuable and interesting documents, and more records becoming available, digitised and accessible on-line in a cost effective manner.

IRI Fundraiser Event